Lars A. Stanley

Class Year
1974
Award Year
2009
Degree
BED
Profession
Architect/Artist
Biography
Lars A. Stanley, ’74 (BED) has won numerous awards and competitive commissions for his work, which focuses on integrating craft, the touch of the hand, into architecture. He was elected to the AIA College of Fellows in 2010 for his contributions to the profession. His diverse portfolio reflects his interest in understanding how human energy is embodied through the process of making and how materials and elements of the built environment are sometimes able to reflect the essence of being human. His design work on Franklin High School for Stanley +PSA Architects helped win the Caudill Design Award for the best-designed high school in Texas, one of Stanley’s many design awards. He’s won competitive national commissions for public art programs, recently completing sculptural projects in Colorado, Arizona, California, Texas and Maine. His use of crafted, artistic elements in collaborations with fellow architects’ designs have also netted awards. Examples include hand-forged railings at the Austin-Bergstrom International Airport in a design by PSP Architects’ Larry Speck, FAIA, entry gate elements and sculpture installations at the recently completed Shangri-La Botanical Gardens designed by Lake-Flato Architects, and entry/hearth elements for a a residence in New York designed for director Steven Spielberg by Charles Gwathmey, FAIA. Stanley worked with University of Texas at Austin facility architects to design and fabricate elements allowing the re-opening of the campus’ historic Main Tower, which had been closed for 25 years. His work has been published nationally in numerous magazines and books and he has presented his work at state and national professional conventions and educational colloquiums. Early inspiration and encouragement from his mother, artist Irene Muller Stanley, and father Duffy Stanley ’45 (BARCH), FAIA, led to studies at Texas A&M, where the university’s innovative environmental design program proved to be the ideal grounding for his future work.
Photo of Lars A. Stanley